“Just because you know something doesn’t mean you have to say it!”

I was raised in a family of four noisy boys. As we grew up, we became quite opinionated, and often argued, quite amicably but noisily, about religious, political, ethical and a thousand more trivial issues that interested us.

When each of us found girlfriends and eventually wives, they didn’t always find our loud and rambunctious conversations easy.

And it didn’t always stop there. As an idealistic and articulate youth, I found it easy to argue with just about anyone. Fortunately, my wife had good advice for me.

Continue reading

Advertisements

The Underground, Florida – a better way to be the church?

Did Jesus mean it to come to this? Yes!! I think he did!!

One common theme of this blog is that the 21st century western church too often seems to have lost the vision of the mission of Jesus, and settled for something far less noble.

So it is a great pleasure to be able to wholeheartedly recommend a branch of the church which seems to have kept central Jesus’ vision to love God and love our neighbours.

If you haven’t heard of it before, let me introduce you to the Underground in Tampa, Florida.

Continue reading

The power of forgiveness

Some readers may recall, 18 months ago, two posts about the long distance endurance cycling race, the inaugural Indian-Pacific Wheel Race, which tragically ended in the death of one of the leading contestants, Mike Hall.

At the time I spoke of the grief many participants and followers of the race felt, and the very sensitive and admirable way in which the cycling community dealt with the tragedy.

Today I can report something even more admirable – how forgiveness can show love in the midst of tragedy.

Continue reading

“Whoever wants to become great among you must be your servant” (Matthew 20:26)

Did Jesus mean it to come to this?

It is too easy to put words into Jesus’ mouth and say what he would or wouldn’t approve of. I won’t fall into that trap, but I will ask some pointed questions.

If Jesus could have foreseen twenty-first century western christianity, what would he think? For instance, what would he think of some of the buildings we construct for churches?

What would he think of the money spent on large ornamental gardens, lakes and fountains?

Would he think large megachurches become impersonal and dehumanise ordinary people while raising up the megapastors until they become greater than their master?

I can’t answer those questions, but I can say that these church edifices make me feel uneasy. I can’t help feeling leaders who are servants should also feel uneasy about them.

Photos mostly taken from the video Underground People, which I will be reviewing next post.

Book review: Beyond the Texts

You can find a lot of different views on the internet about the accuracy of Old Testament history and how archaeology does, or doesn’t, support the Old Testament accounts. Minimalist historians, and internet sceptics, will tell you it’s almost all invented myth, while maximalist historians and christian apologists will tell you that archaeology supports the truth of the entire Bible.

How does an honest seeker after the truth find a way between the conflicting extremes to a fair understanding?

The best way, it seems to me, is to read an expert who is as unbiased as possible, with a slight leaning towards the sceptical. That way, I can be reasonably confident that anything the expert tells me is likely to be accurate, and maybe a little more besides.

So it was with these expectations that I purchased and read William Dever’s Beyond the Texts: An Archaeological Portrait of Ancient Israel and Judah. And it lived up to my hopes.

Continue reading

Urban tribes and the church (part2)

The story so far …..

Last post (Urban tribes and the church) I discussed how on a recent holiday I was observing young urban Generation Z professionals, and musing what they might think about church, or at least most churches.

I felt there were many ways that modern western christianity was an alien culture to them. This post, I want to look at what churches and christians should maybe do to address this.

Continue reading

Urban tribes and the church

We’ve just come back from a short holiday in Melbourne, Australia’s second largest city. We stayed in South Yarra, an inner urban and somewhat hip location which is noticeably different to the suburb where we live in Sydney.

The obvious differences start with the dense inner urban environment of high-rise apartments and offices, the streetscapes of trendy clothing shops, cafes, restaurants, bars and coffee shops, and the footpaths busy with mostly young professionals, hurrying to and from work, meeting up for drinks and meals, or buying food at the local markets.

And there are not many churches for all these people, because, fairly obviously, few of them would be interested. We attended a nearby church that aims to “reach a post-church generation with real encounters with God” and while the service was informal and lively and the congregation was young and included some creatives, there weren’t many South Yarra hipsters there.

The whole experience made me ponder again how the christian faith might be meaningful to these inner urban professionals, and how the church might need to adapt if it wants to be alive in the next generation.

Continue reading